Blogshare day: Social Media Myths that Can Cripple an Author Platform


Kristen Lamb's profile informationFound this fascinating post over at Kristen Lamb’s Blog. Kristen always has such great things to say about social media … if you don’t already follow her blog, check it out!

As the Social Media Jedi for Writers, I am very blessed to be able to speak and teach around the country at various writing conferences. I am always open to learning new methods, and I love hearing other perspectives. Yet, with the good, comes the bad, the ugly and the downright—in my POV—boneheaded observations about social media. My favorites?

Read the rest via 3 Social Media Myths that Can Cripple Our Author Platform « Kristen Lamb's Blog.

Are you an author or a reader? Do you use Twitter and/or Facebook? What are your likes and dislikes about Twitter, Facebook and all the rest?


4 thoughts on “Blogshare day: Social Media Myths that Can Cripple an Author Platform

  • Ms RTL

    As a reader I love following authors, both on Twitter and Facebook. As a library professional I also follow a lot of libraries, librarians and publishers. Throw in romance reviewers and bloggers and that is a huge and diverse mix. It is fascinating to observe how many authors interact with fellow authors yet only passingly acknowledge a reader’s comment or mention. Not all, but some, certainly. To give balance, though, it can take time to build that relationship, so you can’t judge too harshly over a short period of time.
    Dislikes would be constant quotes on FB or retweets on twitter without any original content.
    Some authors do social media brilliantly and one of my favorites purely for her Facebook posts would have to be Eloisa James. A perfect bland of family, without getting too personal or TMI, insightful, fun and/or interesting posts, giveaways, news about books without cramming promotional material into every message.
    On twitter purely for fun and balance of content, I like Jill Shalvis.
    It’s not appropriate to name the accounts I have stopped following but most of them would be due to one or a combination of the reasons Kristen’s mentions in her article.

    • Julie Post author

      Great observations and comments!

      “To give balance, though, it can take time to build that relationship, so you can’t judge too harshly over a short period of time.” So very true. I think it’s also a bit like a real cocktail party. You tend to hang with the folks you know until you’re comfortable. Then you drink and stand on tables and sing off-key. Well, *I* don’t. But still :)

      I love Jill’s blog! She’s definitely got a knack for it!! Eloisa, too!

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